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A Brief History of the Log Cabin

 

Building with logs has a romantic and vintage feel to it, reminiscent of lakeside retreats and getting back to nature. Have you ever wondered when log building really took off as an industry? It is a method of construction that has been around for many centuries. In fact, log building was first documented in Roman times when architect Vitruvius Pollio noted that dwellings in Turkey were being made from laying logs in a horizontal and overlapping manner. Gaps were filled with mud and chips to help insulation. Most of the current techniques used began in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe.

The methods involved stacking trunks on top of each other, whilst overlapping them at the corners to create cabins made out of logs. This made for much stronger structures that could be made weather-proof why by stuffing the gaps with soft material like moss, for example. It soon became apparent that solid wood constructions were much warmer than timber frames draped with animal skins, felt or shingles.

Image credit

Log construction took off in Scandinavia as the trees that grew there were well-suited to it. The trees were straight and tall, pine and spruce being the most prevalent available. With the right tools, a log cabin could be made in a few days to provide shelter to a family. There was no need to wait for chemical processes or for mortar to set, so a cabin could be constructed at any time of year and in any weather. Why not consider having your very own version from Log Cabins Northern Ireland?

As time progressed, new and more effective techniques were developed for keeping corners weather-tight with joints between logs. The log cabin never really took off in Britain, the skill skipping the nation on their way to frontier America. Medieval Britons preferred to build in hardwood and local stone.

Britain didn’t enjoy the benefits of huge swathes of quick-growing coniferous forests like Scandinavia enjoyed. They also didn’t have access to the abundant softwoods that they found in America. However, since the growth of the commercial forestry industry, more suitable tree species have been introduced into the UK and led to the increase in popularity of log cabin construction.

Now we too can enjoy the benefits of log cabin building. They are aesthetically good-looking, functional and now benefit from the latest technology in weather-proofing and comfort. They have become an incredibly popular choice for holiday homes found in stunning natural and waterside locations.

Image credit

The beauty of log cabins is the natural element of the construction. Going back to our roots, using material available around us and satisfying the primal urge to provide shelter to survive. The materials that are used to build log cabins today are the same as they have always been and even though the techniques might have become refined, even they remain virtually unchanged.

 

 

 

Building with logs has a romantic and vintage feel to it, reminiscent of lakeside retreats and getting back to nature. Have you ever wondered when log building really took off as an industry? It is a method of construction that has been around for many centuries. In fact, log building was first documented in Roman times when architect Vitruvius Pollio noted that dwellings in Turkey were being made from laying logs in a horizontal and overlapping manner. Gaps were filled with mud and chips to help insulation. Most of the current techniques used began in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe.

The methods involved stacking trunks on top of each other, whilst overlapping them at the corners to create cabins made out of logs. This made for much stronger structures that could be made weather-proof why by stuffing the gaps with soft material like moss, for example. It soon became apparent that solid wood constructions were much warmer than timber frames draped with animal skins, felt or shingles.

Image credit

Log construction took off in Scandinavia as the trees that grew there were well-suited to it. The trees were straight and tall, pine and spruce being the most prevalent available. With the right tools, a log cabin could be made in a few days to provide shelter to a family. There was no need to wait for chemical processes or for mortar to set, so a cabin could be constructed at any time of year and in any weather. Why not consider having your very own version from Log Cabins Northern Ireland?

As time progressed, new and more effective techniques were developed for keeping corners weather-tight with joints between logs. The log cabin never really took off in Britain, the skill skipping the nation on their way to frontier America. Medieval Britons preferred to build in hardwood and local stone.

Britain didn’t enjoy the benefits of huge swathes of quick-growing coniferous forests like Scandinavia enjoyed. They also didn’t have access to the abundant softwoods that they found in America. However, since the growth of the commercial forestry industry, more suitable tree species have been introduced into the UK and led to the increase in popularity of log cabin construction.

Now we too can enjoy the benefits of log cabin building. They are aesthetically good-looking, functional and now benefit from the latest technology in weather-proofing and comfort. They have become an incredibly popular choice for holiday homes found in stunning natural and waterside locations.

Image credit

The beauty of log cabins is the natural element of the construction. Going back to our roots, using material available around us and satisfying the primal urge to provide shelter to survive. The materials that are used to build log cabins today are the same as they have always been and even though the techniques might have become refined, even they remain virtually unchanged.

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